[Reviewers]

Like most authors, I’m delighted to have new readers discover my work – and what better way than word-of-mouth?  Reviewers, who spend their time reading, comprehending and writing about strange, obscure, unusual, and out of the mainstream tales play a crucial role in this.

If you’re a reviewer who likes a challenge, then my work may appeal to you. Before you contact me please read a sample of my work.  A substantial mix is available, from my poetic prose, through my works in progress, to my magnum opus, Malmaxa (complex literary fiction with a philosophic slant).  Why read before you review? Well, how can you review if you haven’t read?

If my samples hold your interest, DM me on Twitter @CGAyling, or leave a comment here.  I may eventually notice it.  I look forward to hearing from you, or anyone else you think my work might interest.

8 Responses to [Reviewers]

  1. Mary Bearden says:

    Hi, I did a review of your first book, Beltamar’s War and I know without a doubt that you are writing or have already written a sequel. No way are you gonna leave a book like that unanswered or left hanging in the air to speak.

    I would so love to read the next one as now you have me caught up in what happens next. Did that silly Adelmeir or however you spell it really get eaten by the groth or did he have a plan and escape? Did the others make it as well?

    So, I figured there were too many unanswered questions along with who the Ancient Enemy is and why do they travel so much if they love this other place so much why can’t they stay there year round? Or is it because they can’t stay in one place too long or they will be found?

    Anyway, could you please include me in the 2nd book to be reviewed? I know it took me awhile to really get into it but now I have to know. I would appreciate being a part of your adventure.

    Sincerely,
    Mary Bearden
    Mary’s Cup of Tea
    mmbear_us@yahoo.com

    • C.G.Ayling says:

      Hi Mary,
      Thanks for writing. Yes the second novel in Malmaxa is already out, it is titled “Malmaxa II – The Pilgrimage”. Since you were kind enough to review Beltamar’s War I’ll be glad to get an eBook version of The Pilgrimage off to you, I’ll email you for your format of choice.
      Now, to answer the questions you raise {at least those I can without spoilers}.
      Adelmar, whose name is of Germanic origin, had no plan to escape, however too often good fortune seems to favor the wicked. What happens to the others is part of the ongoing tale – their tribulations are far from done.
      Realization there are many unanswered questions reveals your insight. Malmaxa is an extremely complex, metaphor filled tale – it is intended to raise questions that each of us should ponder. Questions such as why we engage in war, when there is no chance for absolute resolution? Why do we blindly do as we’re told, without understanding why we’re doing it? What is love? Do we truly have a spiritual connection with our family? Is what we are, more important than who we are? Along with various others… {I’m very pleased you’ve picked up on these themes, and are intrigued enough to want to continue this journey.}
      Let me correct one misconception. Apart from those engaged in war, the Seizen don’t always travel around – for five and a half out of every six cycles they live in villages and towns. Beltamar’s War opens as everyone prepares to obey the 3rd divine law, “Six times shall you be in a place of conception, beneath Malmaxa.” Like the other laws, it is a command requiring absolute obedience, and the Seizen obey without question. Metaphorically speaking, would you drop literally everything once every six years and make an arduous journey, to obey a law you don’t even understand?
      Look for my email, but heed my warning… even at the end of the second book, Malmaxa is far from over.
      Charles.

  2. Mary Bearden says:

    I did get the 2nd book but there was no note so I am not sure who sent it.

    I need to know if I am reviewing it for you or for the PR Agency. I emailed the one that
    did your first book but never got a reply which was odd.

    Then this book shows up and I had to read it ASAP and I am finished but don’t know what to do. Could you let me know if I am reviewing for you, or the PR Agency and if I am for either of you, will I be doing a giveaway like the last time?

    I loved this book and it certainly had a very dramatic ending. I am beginning to suspect that the Overseers are actually running everything and that they are making the minds of the warrior’s memories of battles up in their heads. Seems quite weird that they would not know how many they have fought and how many have died.

    Then one of the groth gets into Malmaxa? And the old hunter sees one outside? It is like they are being called there every 6 years to satisfy something that the Overseers want. And then they forget.

    Can’t wait for the next one! I will go ahead and have the review ready waiting for someone to tell me what to do. Once I know something I will publish with or without a giveaway. Just need to know where to send the link also when it’s done.

    Thanks so much for letting me in on the journey of Malmaxa. I am really actually liking it alot more than I thought I would.

    Sincerely,
    Mary Bearden

    • C.G.Ayling says:

      “And then they forget.” – another insightful comment, Mary. Thank you – I’ve emailed you – it was I who sent the second novel to you. ~ Charles

  3. We have shared a couple of tweets recently, and I’ve loved your responses on “misuser of words” (yet editorially correct) and “lyrical prose.” Enjoyed your samples very much. Didn’t see on your blog how to purchase your books, but I will check it out on amazon. I try to purchase eBooks that I review so I can–(1) support a fellow author; (2) download to my Kindle so I can highlight, search, bookmark, this is strictly for my own use and please, do not construe it as a microscope; and (3) I can read at night on the Kindle fire, which is backlit, while my husband sleeps. I read your samples and imagined we are kindred spirits that were separated at birth because the triple goddess needed us in different geographical locations. Your lyrical prose I was delighted to find out was poetry! I have roughly a dozen poems published, but it was done just shy of the brick and mortar era when everything was carved in stone, literally. I will have to type one out for you, “The Verde Man,” I think and send it. I have copied a file from my full-length novel LIVING IN A SHADOW as a sample. Let me know if I should send it. A cut and paste? I love your blog and the way your page is set up. I’m not that far along yet. I’m sure I’m much older than you are, and I’ve been out of the market for a decade, having published a variety of things since I was 12 years old to age 40-something–oh, all right, 50! (minus a decade?) Yeah, I’m old. I was intrigued by your desire to work with a non-profit. I was raised in a family where everything was kept hidden, especially illness. I contacted the Lupus Foundation back in the early 1990’s for support and education. They looked at my credentials and asked me to write their newsletter, and I would have done so, but unfortunately, even though I was medically disabled, I still had to earn a living. I have now added the fact that I’m a survivor of Lupus/RA in my bio. My family isn’t thrilled, but my husband is proud of me. I have supported non-profits for many years as an unpaid musician (piano, Celtic harp, and vocals). Now that I have bored you completely, I can’t wait to go back to your blog and experience your journey with twitter because mine began only a few months ago. The book APE (Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur) is my new Bible, recommended to me by a friend of a friend, an author. I want to break the “glass ceiling” of poor craftsmanship that floods our field. I do so hope I don’t have a typo in this. I like to laugh at myself and enjoy life. This essay is too serious!

    • C.G.Ayling says:

      Dear Deborah,
      Nothing you said bores me, indeed it all delights me.
      I hope you know just how much someone taking the time to write anything to an author means. In case you don’t – it means a lot.
      I am very appreciative of your comments and can only say how much I hope Malmaxa doesn’t disappoint.
      In another vein, your tweet to me has prompted a blog post I’ll try and get up sometime today. ~ Charles

  4. Okay, I’ll stop the dribble and off-the-cuff. I’ve pasted a section from my full-length novel, LIVING IN A SHADOW. This a an example of my definition of lyrical prose/poetry to follow soon:

    When Lou had first started reading, he’d wondered if Jimmy might want to rework Chapter One after his depression had completely subsided. But no, that wouldn’t be right. It was perfect to develop the main character this way. This was real human nature.
    People aren’t all good, nor are they all bad, Lou rationalized. We change and we grow and we evolve daily. Yeah, Jimmy, make this guy crude and dirty and disgustin’! Make him real! I mean, what else could possibly come from this environment you’ve so beautifully created?
    And it was beautiful. Description didn’t have to be flowery or poetic to be beautiful. Beauty was in the rise and fall of the words on the page to create a tone like speaking. It was in the soft, hushed syllables of darkness and despair. It was in the utter hopelessness of the situation. It grabbed your heart and enlivened your senses. Beauty was born out of empathy and the unfairness of it all. Beauty was in the heart of the man. A heart at first glance, that had looked so cold and black, only beauty could bring sanity back from the madness.
    “Jimmy,” Lou mused aloud, practically under his breath, “your new-foun’ friend got a tough row to hoe and a long way home. You’re givin’ your readers truth and cold, cruel reality.”
    Lou nodded his head. He hoped the stranger could find his way back from deep despair just as he hoped Jimmy could.
    Lou, however, was struggling with his own dilemma. What could he possibly say to Jimmy to express the depth of his feelings on this novel?
    Jimmy’s words came back to Lou as he pondered the task ahead: “I want to dissect the problems of society, one man, one character, at a time.”
    “How true, Jimmy, how true,” Lou whispered to the silent office building.
    * * *

    When Lou had first started reading, he’d wondered if Jimmy might want to rework Chapter One after his depression had completely subsided. But no, that wouldn’t be right. It was perfect to develop the main character this way. This was real human nature.
    People aren’t all good, nor are they all bad, Lou rationalized. We change and we grow and we evolve daily. Yeah, Jimmy, make this guy crude and dirty and disgustin’! Make him real! I mean, what else could possibly come from this environment you’ve so beautifully created?
    And it was beautiful. Description didn’t have to be flowery or poetic to be beautiful. Beauty was in the rise and fall of the words on the page to create a tone like speaking. It was in the soft, hushed syllables of darkness and despair. It was in the utter hopelessness of the situation. It grabbed your heart and enlivened your senses. Beauty was born out of empathy and the unfairness of it all. Beauty was in the heart of the man. A heart at first glance, that had looked so cold and black, only beauty could bring sanity back from the madness.
    “Jimmy,” Lou mused aloud, practically under his breath, “your new-foun’ friend got a tough row to hoe and a long way home. You’re givin’ your readers truth and cold, cruel reality.”
    Lou nodded his head. He hoped the stranger could find his way back from deep despair just as he hoped Jimmy could.
    Lou, however, was struggling with his own dilemma. What could he possibly say to Jimmy to express the depth of his feelings on this novel?
    Jimmy’s words came back to Lou as he pondered the task ahead: “I want to dissect the problems of society, one man, one character, at a time.”
    “How true, Jimmy, how true,” Lou whispered to the silent office building.
    * * *

  5. C.G.Ayling says:

    “People aren’t all good, nor are they all bad” – how I wish everyone realized this.
    As good is never perfectly pure, evil is never completely corrupt.
    I love the sample, many truths packed into your prose. Going to try and find a copy for myself. ~ Charles

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